City of Troy NY Police Department
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Report a Crime

The ability of the police to locate and arrest criminals often depends on the thoroughness and accuracy of the report you submit. The following information checklist should be used for reporting both emergency and non-emergency crimes:

  • Type of crime
  • Location: exact street address and nearest cross street
  • Time of occurrence
  • Weapons used
  • Number of persons injured and types of injuries
  • Vehicle information: type, license number, color, year, make, model, unusual characteristics (e.g., dents, bumper stickers), number of persons, etc.
  • Suspect information: race, gender, age, height, weight, hair color, hair length and style, eye color, facial hair, clothing type and color, other characteristics (e.g., tattoos, missing teeth, scars, glasses), direction of flight, etc.

CRIME EMERGENCIES  |  Dial 9-1-1

  • Below are some examples of crime emergencies that should be reported by calling 9-1-1
  • Fights, sexual assaults, etc.
  • Homicides
  • Burglaries and robberies
  • Flashlight beam in a business or home, especially if the business is closed or the residents are away
  • Domestic violence
  • Child and elder abuse
  • Sounds of gunshots, screaming, barking dogs, breaking glass, explosions, alarms, etc.
  • Hit and run accidents with possible injuries
  • Vehicles containing weapons or property not normally kept in vehicles
  • Ongoing dumping of fuel or other hazardous substances
  • Road hazards that require immediate attention to prevent personal injuries and property damage
  • Graffiti and other acts of vandalism in progress
  • Runaway juvenile or missing person who needs special care -- be sure to tell the operator if the person needs medication and has a special problem, e.g., Alzheimer's disease

 Persons who are….

  • Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs
  • Entering a neighbor's home when the neighbor is away
  • Forcing an entry of a home, business, or vehicle
  • Exhibiting unusual mental or physical symptoms that poses a threat to him/herself or others
  • Removing property from a business, home, or vehicle, especially if the business is closed or the residents are away
  • Carrying or wearing bloody clothing
  • Struggling with a resisting child
  • Trying to or actually using a vehicle to pick up a person by force, especially a child or female

When should I call 9-1-1?
When there is an emergency, lives are in danger, serious injury, serious medical condition, crime in progress, or any other situation needing immediate attention.

Do I have to give my name when I call 9-1-1?
If you wish to remain anonymous or keep information confidential just tell the operator.

What should I do if I see a crime occurring ?

  • Call 9-1-1 immediately.
  • Be observant and make mental notes.
  • Are there any weapons involved?
  • What is the address?
  • Any physical characteristics such as height, weight, race, beard, or scars?
  • Any clothing description?
  • How many people involved?
  • Are the persons involved on foot or in a vehicle?

How do I teach my children to Use 9-1-1?

  • Never say "nine eleven." There is no eleven on a telephone keypad or dial. Always say "nine-one-one."
  • Always call from a safe place. If there is a fire in the house, get out first and then call.
  • Post your address near the phone.
  • Never call 9-1-1 as a prank or joke. You can get into trouble and keep someone who really needs help from getting it in time.
  • 9-1-1 is not for animal emergencies. Leave the number for the vet next to the phone. If you need to reach the City's Dog Warden call (518) 270-4640.
  • Call 9-1-1 if you think you have an emergency and explain the situation to the dispatcher. If you call 9-1-1 by mistake, don't hang up. Explain the mistake to the dispatcher and say there is NO EMERGENCY.

CRIME NON-EMERGENCIES  |  Dial (518) 270-4411

The City of Troy Police Department's response to non-emergency calls will depend on the relative seriousness or priority of the situation, the likelihood of making an arrest at the scene, and the availability of an officer. Response times are the longest for so-called "cold crimes" like home burglaries where the perpetrator has fled the scene, no suspects exist, and the victim is in no further danger.

Below are some example situations that may not be emergencies:

  • Home and business burglaries in which the suspect is gone from the scene
    Open or broken doors or windows in businesses or homes, especially if the business is closed or the residents are away
  • Stolen checks and credit cards -- also call the financial institutions involved to have them stop payments of checks and verifications of charges
  • Impersonation and stolen identification, e.g., drivers license
  • Auto theft and vandalism
  • Hit and run accidents with no injuries
  • Minors violating curfew
  • Loud parties -- the person calling must be willing to sign a complaint
  • Road hazards that don't require immediate attention
  • Past instances of graffiti or other vandalism
  • Past instances of child or elder abuse
  • Runaway juvenile or missing adult who does not need special care
  • Car or building alarms
  • Underage drinking
  • Accumulations of consumer goods, especially in good condition and not in use in homes, garages, and storage areas

Persons who are…

  • Disturbing the peace, i.e., loitering, panhandling, noise making, and harassing others
  • Soliciting without a license, not displaying a valid registration card, or operating between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m.
  • Going door-to-door, or into side or back yards in a residential area
  • Loitering near a business or home, especially if the business is closed or the residents are away
  • Loitering near schools or parks
  • Looking into parked vehicles
  • Running other than for exercise
  • Carrying property at an unusual time and place
  • Entering and leaving property on daily or regular basis, or in large numbers, especially at night
  • Drunk in public but not in any immediate danger
  • Exhibiting unusual mental or physical symptoms but not a danger to themselves or others
  • Offering goods for sale at ridiculously low prices
  • Making a quick change of vehicles